Archive for July, 2008

The Bonhoeffer Blog Conference

This is taken from Halden’s post over at Inhabitatio Dei:

The Bonhoeffer Blog Conference, though still a ways off is coming together nicely.  Here is a tentative list of participants with their paper titles:

  • Day 1: Introduction by Halden
  • Day 2: ‘Christ my Conscience’: Bonhoeffer on Identity, Moral Integrity, and Christian Community by Chris Green
  • Day 3: ’Being Made in Human Likeness’: ‘Ethics as Formation’ and Von Balthasar’s Concrete Universal by Eric Meyer
  • Day 4: Salvation as Humanification: Bonhoeffer’s Ethical Soteriology by Adam McInturf
  • Day 5: Bonhoeffer and Levinas (Title TBA) by Eric Roorback
  • Day 6: The Ethics of Justification: Bonhoeffer and Jüngel on the Implications of the Doctrine of Justification for Christian Ethics by D.W. Congdon
  • Day 7: TBA
At this point we are now in need of respondents to the various plenary papers that are set to be presented.  Responses should be 500-750 words and offer constructive engagement with the plenary in question.  If you wish to write a response, please let Halden know by email at halden-at-wipfandstock-dot-com or leave a comment on his post.

John D. Caputo on Love

“Let us speak then of love. What does it mean to “love” something? If a man asks a woman…”do you love me?” and if, after a long and awkward pause and considerable deliberation, she replies with wrinkled brow, “well, up to a certain point, under certain conditions, and to a certain extent,” then we can be sure that whatever it is she feels for this poor fellow it is not love and this relationship is not going to work out. For if love is the measure, the only measure of love is love without measure (Augustine again). One of the ideas behind “love” is that it represents a giving without holding back, an “unconditional” commitment, which marks love with a certain excess…If a woman divorces a man because he turned out to be a failure in his profession and just did not measure up to the salary expectations she had for him when they married, if she complains that he did not live up to his end of the “bargain,” well, that is not the sort of till-death-us-do-part, unconditional commitment that is built into marital love and the marital vow. Love is not a bargain, but unconditional giving; it is not an investment, but a commitment come what may. Lovers are people who exceed their duty, who look around for ways to do more than is required of them. If you love your job, you don’t just do the minimum that is required of you; you do more. If you love your children, what would you not do for them? If a wife asks a husband to do her a favor, and he declines on the grounds that he is really not duty bound by the strict terms of the marriage contract to do it, that marriage is all over except for the paper work. Rather than rigorously defending their rights, lovers readily put themselves in the wrong and take the blame for the sake of preserving their love…A world without love is a world governed by rigid contracts and inexorable duties, a world in which – God forbid! – the lawyers run everything. The mark of really loving someone or something is unconditionality and excess, engagement and commitment, fire and passion. Its opposite is a mediocre fellow, neither hot nor cold, moderate to the point of mediocrity. Not worth saving. No salt.”

John D. Caputo, On Religion (New York: Routledge, 2001) pg. 4-5.